Transgender Day of Remembrance (A day after, but never late.)

Yesterday was TDoR. I respectfully ask everyone reading this post to please open this link to the list of all those who have died because they were living in their own gender. Please do so knowing that this is triggering for almost anyone. TW on this post in general for violence and bigotry.

I want to tell you the story of how my 10th grade teacher taught me why shock is not always a valuable tool to change hatred.

To begin with you need to understand my exposure to transgendered life. My family is filled with trans activists, with people who transitioned before I was born. I was raised to understand that sometimes people were born in the wrong bodies, and that it is OK to make changes in order to live the life you need to live.

So when I was in the 10th grade, we had a unit on racism and hate crimes in my literature class. I’m not entirely sure how it came up, but someone said something pretty awful and moments later our teacher was angry – and she told us all to watch “Boys Don’t Cry” the movie about Brandon Teena. For those who aren’t aware, the film is the story of a trans youth who was raped and murdered because of who he was. Being the well behaved student that IĀ  was, when my grandmother picked me up from school I told her we needed to rent a movie for my homework – I wasn’t actually aware of how intense the movie was, and I certainly didn’t know what my reaction was going to be.

I watched the movie in my grandparents basement by myself, and afterwards I cried for four hours. Watching the movie hadn’t just been about watching the story of Brandon, but had been about watching the story of every person in my life who was trans, and the abuse that they might suffer were they in the wrong place at the wrong time, were they to come out to the wrong person, or were they to be found out.

We shouldn’t live in a world where watching a movie should make you so terrified for your people that you cannot hold it together enough to leave the basement.

I called my mother in tears and told her what I had watched, and she told me that she was disappointed in my teacher for having told impressionable teens to watch a movie like that. When she saw it in the theaters, she said that grown adults were sobbing in the aisles,. and she felt physically sick while watching the movie.

I’m glad this movie exists for one reason only: it is a great teaching tool if you’re not a part of the community. If you don’t understand the persecution, and the cruelty that happens to people who try to lead their lives in the way that feels right. It is an unflinching view of cruelty and reality.

The point of this story is this: Sometimes we don’t need television or movies to understand fear. For me, I actually didn’t need to see that movie. I probably shouldn’t have. For some of my classmates, it was likely a harrowing but life changing film.

The fact of the matter is that we still live in a time when the Brandon Teena story could happen again. Even yesterday on TDoR itself, I was helping a friend gather resources for a young trans person who does not have a home to go back to. I have heard my trans peers talk about experiences that made them want to commit suicide rather than live in the gender which society assigns them at birth. I have seen friends thrown out of their homes, threatened with abuse, and yes – I have known about suicides.

Being transgendered is not an easy path to walk, and I hope that people will educate themselves, and lend a hand when someone is in danger – because every life lost to bigotry is tragic, even if we didn’t know each other. Our jobs, as allies, as cisgendered people – we need to become better at supporting those who are different. We need to become better at supporting the families of those who lead different lives. Please learn to be tolerant, because without that tolerance we are lost in a sea of hate. The biggest thing you can do TODAY is to never ever call someone by the gender which they DO NOT identify with. Using pronouns THEY choose is another big one. Respecting their name choice. Make these shifts in your language, and you make the world a slightly better place.

 

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4 Comments

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4 responses to “Transgender Day of Remembrance (A day after, but never late.)

  1. Thank you.

    Even though I want to see Boys Don’t Cry, I have never been able to bring myself to watch it. Like wise, I’ve never been able to watch “A Girl Like Me: The Gwen Araujo Story” (www.imdb.com/title/tt0787484/) as it hits even closer to home.

    May I also recommend not using the word “tranny”. It’s a dehumanizing slur used against trans people in general and trans women in specific. It is also frequently the last word a trans person hears before an act of horrific violence. While some trans people maybe reclaiming the word, and removing its power, not every trans person is in the same place. Being called a tranny can be deeply triggering.

    Again, thank you for being ally. ā¤

    • Personally, I think allies often get too many thanks for doing what is human – but I’ll take them when they come from a source I know personally. Thank you for being brave enough to be who you are.

      • I totally agree with you there, trying to be a decent human being myself, but there are two things I’ve learned from being a masochist. Er, I mean, activist. šŸ˜‰

        The first is that people are generally blind to their privilege. That ties into the second thing I’ve learned.

        People who are a part of an oppressive group rarely accept the experience of marginalized people until they hear about it from a member of the group they belong to.

        That’s why I say “thank you” for you doing the right thing. šŸ™‚

        Thank you, but I’m not brave. I’m just doing what I have to.

  2. Pingback: Transgender Day of Remembrance (A day after, but never late … « Enfemme

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